Skip to main content
Center for Conservation Biology

Laboratory Staff and Students

Lab Manager

Rebecca Booth

Rebecca Booth

Rebecca Nelson Booth conducts hormone and DNA analyses on the wide variety of animal species studied by the CCB since 2003. She is dedicated to combining her love and passion for wildlife and the environment with lab techniques and experiments that facilitate conservation.


Laboratory Research Scientists

 

Amy Torkleson

Amy Torkleson

Amy Torkelson

Amy joined the CCB in 2013 and currently manages the ivory project.  She is a UW Biology graduate with a background in cardiac repair and stem cell research.  After exposure to various research techniques, she came to the CCB to pursue her passion for wildlife conservation.  Amy’s love for nature and wildlife is a driving force in her life, and she is happy to be a part of a project working so hard to make a difference in the illegal ivory trade.

 

 

20141009_102048

Misa Winters

Misa Winters

Misa became part of the ivory team in 2014 and now acts as our resident methods guru. She received her MS in Zoology from Washington State University and applies her 4 years of ancient DNA experience (Kemp lab of Molecular Anthropology and Ancient DNA) to continue optimizing our DNA retrieval from scat and ivory. Misa has a huge love for all animals and enjoys being part of the CCB’s mission to apply non-invasive forensic methods to the illegal wildlife trade and ecological research.

 

 

Yves

Yves Hoareau

Yves Hoareau

Currently working on the ivory tracking project, Yves is passionate about nature and wants to dedicate his career to wildlife preservation. Yves originates from France where he studied Biodiversity, Ecology, Ethology, Evolution, Genetics, Population Biology, and Programming. Attracted by the wonders of the Rockies, he came to the U.S to work at the University of Montana on numerous conservation subjects. Yves is now part of the team, sharing his diverse experiences to further help Wildlife conservation.

 

 

2013_05_Tara-Wilson1

Tara Wilson

Tara Wilson

Tara received her BS from UW in Environmental Science and Terrestrial Resource Management: Wildlife Conservation and a minor in Quantitative Science. She started volunteering at the CCB in 2013 as an undergrad. Currently, she works on hormones and DNA from a variety of projects. Originally a Detroit native, she moved to the Pacific Northwest for its striking beauty and vast wildlife gradients. She enjoys being surrounded by her two favorite passions: science and wildlife!

 

 

Ellie Reese

Ellie Reese

Ellie Reese

Ellie joined the CCB team in 2016 and works on the ivory tracking project and the NE Washington carnivore diet study. A Washington state native, she received her MS in Biology from the University of California, San Diego before returning to her home in the pacific northwest. Prior to joining the Center for Conservation Biology, she studied the ecology of desert insects and described six species of beetles. She has a long-held passion for wildlife and the outdoors and is happy to use her skills to contribute to the preservation of endangered species!


TOP OF PAGE


Post Doctorate


Graduate students

Jennifer White posing with black lab in snowy mountain pass

Jennifer White

Jennifer Mae White-Day

Jennifer MW Day is a graduate student researching landscape genetic patterns of jaguar and puma in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. She is interested in quantifying the relationship between geographic characteristics and spatially explicit genetic information. Her research focuses on wide-ranging carnivore species, such as the jaguar and puma, in patchy environments. By investigating the relationships between human land use, wildlife movement patterns, and phylogeography, Jennifer will create a spatial assessment of the Yucatan’s conservation priorities. Her dissertation work will be applicable to many other wildlife species faced with human encroachment on natural habitats.

Jennifer MW Day Curriculum Vitae and Dependable Strengths


Yue Shi

Yue Shi

Yue Shi

Yue Shi is a graduate student in the Biology Department at the UW. She is interested in the non-invasive research tools pioneered by the Center to study the Tibetan antelopes (Chirus)’ migration on the Tibetan Plateau. Her research will focus on identification of the calving grounds of chirus and how anthropogenic activities such as highway, fencing, mining and oil development would increase the cost of migration for these animals.


Hyeon Jeong

Hyeon Jeong (HJ) Kim is a graduate student working towards developing a genetic
tool to track the illegal poaching of pangolins. She is interested in expanding and applying
the genetic and statistical techniques currently used for ivory origin assignment to help locate the source of poaching for species of pangolins world-wide. Her research will include identifying a set of genetic markers (SNPs) for population assignment tests, creating a genetic reference map of pangolin populations, and developing field methods for scientific sampling of poached pangolin seizures.

 

CCB Alumni