Laboratory staff and students

Lab staff

Rebecca Booth

Rebecca Booth

Rebecca Nelson Booth conducts hormone and DNA analyses on the wide variety of animal species studied by the CCB. She is dedicated to combining her love and passion for wildlife and the environment with lab techniques and experiments that facilitate conservation.

Before joining the Center for Conservation Biology, Rebecca worked at Western Fisheries Research Center assisting in the study of Chinook salmon immunology and disease. Rebecca received her A.S. in Biotechnology from Shoreline Community College in 2001, a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Washington in 2004, and has been working in the CCB lab since September 2003.


Celia Mailand

Celia Mailand

Celia Mailand

Celia joined the Center for Conservation Biology as an undergraduate volunteer in June of 2004, assisting in the genetic tracking of poached elephant ivory. She became a Center employee in August 2004 and went on to optimize methods to extract DNA from ivory. She has played an important role in creating the geographic-based map of elephant gene frequencies, used to assign large ivory seizures to their places of origin.

An appreciation and love for nature guided Celia to pursue a career in conservation. She enjoys being a participant in the inspirational mission of the Center and to work on a project that has had real impacts on the ivory trade.

In 2005, Celia graduated from the Department of Biology at the University of Washington with a Bachelor of Science. She was a Howard Hughes Biology Fellow as an undergraduate and participated in research programs in the labs of Drs. Benjamin Hall and Roger del Moral.


Postdocs

Samrat Mondol

Samrat Mondol

Samrat Mondol is a Fulbright Fellow and postdoctoral student in the Department of Biology and Center for Conservation Biology. Samrat completed his PhD from the National Center for Biological Sciences in India after finishing his Bachelor’s degree in Genetics, Microbiology and Biochemistry and Master’s in Genetics. His dissertation research focused on tiger and leopard population genetics and demography, estimating their current and historic genetic diversity, population size, population declines, connectivity, relatedness and social structure.

Samrat is collaborating with our Center to validate and integrate noninvasive hormone analyses into a broader program that includes monitoring the distribution, abundance and physiological health of tigers and leopards across India, as well forensic applications to the illegal wildlife trade. The latter includes developing a user-friendly version of the Smoothed-Continuous Assignment Method (SCAT) our Center developed to assign poached material to its place of origin. Samrat also collaborates with other members of our team on method development applied to a wide variety of vertebrates.


Graduate students

Jennifer White

Jennifer White posing with black lab in snowy mountain pass

Jennifer White

Jennifer White is a graduate student researching landscape genetic patterns of jaguar and puma in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. She is interested in quantifying the relationship between geographic characteristics and spatially explicit genetic information. Her research focuses on wide-ranging carnivore species, such as the jaguar and puma, in patchy environments. By investigating the relationships between human land use, wildlife movement patterns, and phylogeography, Jennifer will create a spatial assessment of the Yucatan’s conservation priorities. Her dissertation work will be applicable to many other wildlife species faced with human encroachment on natural habitats.

Jennifer earned her B.A. degree in Biology and Environmental Studies from Gettysburg College, Pennsylvania. She has worked as a field technician for many projects including: ocelot ecology in Belize, swift fox ecology in Colorado, plant-herbivore dynamics in Panama, herpetofauna biodiversity in South Carolina, plant biodiversity in Minnesota, and non-native plants in the Grand Canyon N.P.. Jennifer has also worked in the laboratory on several wildlife genetics projects with Michigan State University.


Jessica Lundin

Jessica Lundin

Jessica Lundin is an EPA STAR Fellow and a graduate student in the Center for Conservation Biology with a focus in environmental toxicology. Her research interests are to evaluate the presence and impacts of environmental contaminants through the biomonitoring of wildlife. Jessica’s research project dissertation will monitor and evaluate contamination in the Puget Sound ecosystem by using detection dogs to collect scat from the endangered Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW). The samples will be analyzed for biologic indices of health and for toxicant levels.

Jessica has a B.Sc. in biomedical science and earned a Master’s degree in epidemiology with an emphasis in environmental toxicology from the University of Minnesota in 2006. She has a background as a Research Scientist evaluating the association of environmental exposures such as perfluorinated compounds (PFOA), metals, pesticides and adverse health outcomes like disease and cancer.



Emily Owens

Emily Owens and her dog Sunny

Emily is an M.Sc.BT graduate student in the biology department at UW. She is currently working on developing an aldosterone assay, an adrenal hormone involved in the regulation of salt, potassium, fluid, and blood pressure.

Emily earned a B.Sc. in Biology from UC Santa Cruz, and completed a senior thesis on community dynamics of sharks and rays in Elkhorn Slough Marine Estuary. She trained and worked under the Oiled Wildlife Care Network of UC Davis, performing wildlife intake and rehab during the Cosco Busan oil spill of 2007 in S.F Bay, CA. She has also been involved in marine biological pollution research, sea otter conservation, marine wildlife veterinary care and research including necropsy and pathology, behavioral ecology, and intertidal fish ecology.

Emily is passionate about education and has taught marine education at UCSC’s Seymour Center, and environmental education at Islandwood on Bainbridge Island, WA. She also loves her dog Sunny, a lot.


Yue Shi

Yue Shi

Yue Shi

Yue Shi is a graduate student in the Biology Department at the UW. She is interested to use the non-invasive research tools pioneered by the Center to study the Tibetan antelopes (Chirus)’ migration on the Tibetan Plateau. Her research will focus on identification of the calving grounds of chirus and how anthropogenic activities such as highway, fencing, mining and oil development would increase the cost of migration for these animals.

Yue has a B.S.c in Biological Sciences and earned a Master’s degree in Ecology with an emphasis in marine ecotoxicology from the Ocean University of China in 2012.


Lab alumni

Carolyn Shores

Carolyn Shores

Carolyn Shores is a graduate student in the biology department at the UW researching the effects of wolf recolonization on mesocarnivores, specifically Canada lynx, bobcat and coyote. She plans to use the non-invasive tools pioneered by the Center for Conservation Biology to study whether wolf recolonization aids recovery of the endangered Canada lynx population in Washington state by stabilizing coyote populations. She graduated from the University of Washington in 2010 with an Honors B.Sc degree in Biology. Her senior thesis examined the diet of gray wolves in the Alberta tar sands, working with Center director, Sam Wasser.

Carolyn’s prior field experience includes research on threatened small mammals in the North Cascades and Methow Valley of Washington state, trophic cascade ecology studies in Colorado and Alberta, lynx remote camera work in the San Juan mountains of Colorado, and wolf ecology in the Apennine mountains of Italy. She volunteered on the Canada lynx capture crew in Washington.


Lisa Hayward

lisa-web

Lisa Hayward

Lisa Hayward studies stress physiology. She is particularly interested in developing physiological measures from scat as relevant indicators of disturbance impacts. Currently she is collaborating with her post-doctoral advisor, Dr. Sam Wasser, as well as managers from U.S Fish and Wildlife and the U.S Forest Service, and motorcycle riders from the Blue Ribbon Coalition to examine the effects of off-road vehicle use on the physiology, behavior and reproductive output of the northern spotted owl. Lisa completed her dissertation work in the lab of John Wingfield on the effects of high maternal corticosterone in egg yolk on offspring development and phenotype.


Kathleen Gobush

Kathleen Gobush

Kathleen Gobush

Kathleen Gobush, Ph.D. completed her doctoral research with the Center for Conservation Biology in June 2008. Her research examined long term impacts of poaching on a population of wild elephants in Tanzania that was severely poached in the 1980′s. She investigated how elephant group composition impacts their competitive ability, reproductive output and stress physiology using non-invasive fecal hormone and molecular techniques. Kathleen was awarded several fellowships to support her graduate work: a University of Washington Alice and Byron Lockwood Graduate Student Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Pre-doctoral Graduate Fellowship and a NSF GK-12 Fellowship.

Kathleen graduated from Barnard College , Columbia University with a B.A. in Biology in 1996. She has backgrounds in field research and laboratory science and brought both skill sets to her doctoral degree pursuit. She studied the behavior ecology and reproduction of several wild species including the black lion tamarin in southern in southern Brazil , greater spear-nosed bats in Trinidad, and Tule elk in Norhern California. In maintaining her goal of promoting the conservation of endangered species, she now works as a research ecologist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration focusing on the recovery of the critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal.


Carly Vynne

Carly Vynne

Carly Vynne

Carly Vynne’s principal research interest is in understanding the functional connectivity of landscapes from the perspective of wide-ranging mammals. As a graduate student in our lab, Carly is currently employing Center techniques to study maned wolves and other large mammals in the Cerrado of Brazil. Her Ph.D. research combines fieldwork, DNA and hormone analysis, and spatial modeling to understand the influence of a changing landscape on the plight of unique and endangered species of the South American savannas. Carly has received fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science at Conservation International, and the National Security Education Program.

Prior to entering graduate school, Carly worked at Conservation International (CI) as the Senior Manager for Biodiversity Analysis and Planning. Before starting at CI, Carly lived and worked in South Africa on a lion introduction project and was the Staff Scientist for a local Sierra Nevada-based NGO. Carly received her B.A. in Environmental Studies from Middlebury College.


Katherine Ayres

Katherine Ayres - Photo by Adam U

Katherine Ayres - Photo by Adam U

Katherine is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biology and the Center for Conservation Biology at the University of Washington and is a Northwest Fisheries Science Center fellow. Katherine received a BA in Biology from Pomona College in 2004 and subsequently worked as a lab technician in the developmental biology lab of Clarissa Cheney at Pomona College studying Drosophila development. Her senior thesis was conducted in the lab of Daniel Martínez at Pomona Collage and described the expression pattern of a gene in hydra involved in nervous system development.

Katherine made a dramatic change in study systems to killer whales for her dissertation work. She has a keen interest in the use of non-invasive physiological monitoring tools and understanding how persistent organic pollutants disrupt the endocrine system. She is also interested in the interface between policy and science as it pertains to environmental issues and helps coordinate an Environmental Policy Seminar at the University of Washington.


Lynn Erckmann, Research Technologist

Lynn performs hormone radioimmunoassays for the Center’s laboratory. She is pleased to be able to play a part in studies that promote wildlife conservation, particularly with endangered species.

She joined the Center in June 2008. Prior to that, Lynn worked for 20 years for Dr. John Wingfield in the Laboratory for Environmental Endocrinology at the University of Washington, managing the lab, conducting hormone radioimmunoassays and overseeing the research birds. During the preceding 20 years she worked for Dr. Gordon Orians on bird behavior, plant-herbivore interactions, and performed chemical assays on plant secondary compounds. She has done extensive field research in Argentina, Costa Rica, Mexico, Alaska, Arizona, and Washington. Lynn received a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Miami in 1964.

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